The Finance Lease Option and Why Ford Transit Custom Is So Attractive a Lease

Van leasing is a common and popular option among business owners. Varied finance methods are available for those who are interested for leasing a van. Finance lease is a particular type that is rapidly gaining popularity among the business owners scouting for a van to lease.

What in the World Is a Finance Lease?

The finance lease is used as a payment mode for businesses to pay for assets such as vehicles. The business is able to acquire vehicles and use it for the period of the lease. This commercial agreement is characterized by the following:

• The business or customer, the lessee in legal terms, gets to pick a vehicle of his choice.

• The leasing company goes out and buys that particular vehicle for the lease.

• The business looks after and assumes responsibility for maintaining the vehicle.

• The business or the lessee is bound to pay monthly rentals for the period of the lease in exchange of the asset.

Usually it is found that the monthly rental is arrived upon by taking into consideration the following things:

• The price of the vehicle initially minus the taxes like VAT or as applicable.

• The leasing period

• The vehicle’s residual value plus the applicable interest.

It is to be noted that in such an agreement the finance company retains legal ownership of the vehicle during the period of the finance lease.

A finance lease comes with its own sets of advantages:

• Capital outflow is kept within means and at a minimal

• The monthly budget remains precise and certain.

• Agreements may also be made with interest rates that are fixed

• One can recover a large portion of the VAT or other applicable taxes according to the laws of the land.

• As an option one may also chose to have the vehicle replaced in case of vehicle failure.

Why You Want To Go For a Ford Transit Custom

Fuel economy is rapidly gaining grounds for manufacturers of vans as a marketing tool of great value. As fleet operators testify Bluemotion, Econetic, Ecoflex and other keywords that signify a new vigor in fuel economy find takers in plenty.

The CO2 emissions have also forced the van leasing community to take a closer look at such vans among which the Ford Transit Custom DCIV is so typical.

The engine along with the state of the art sophisticated right off-the-shelf features that are distinctively superior to the fuel saving features of other conventional vans.

There is no dearth of new technology also, such as Acceleration control that cuts down on fuel spend in a big way. Tires, brakes and other components are also spared of some of the torture.

Driving in urban scenarios is made with ten percent less fuel consumption in the Econetic model that boasts of a standard stop-start. Some models also sport of a switchable seventy miles to the hour speed limiter, an unique and innovative engine calibration, an optimized gearbox that has a six percent longer final drive ration and the like.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off

Accounting, Engineering, and Computer Science Salaries on the Rise

In the Spring 2010 issue of Salary Survey, the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) announced that starting salaries for accounting, finance, engineering and compute science majors are on the rise. This is in the face of decreases in starting salary offers for other recent graduates who majored in business administration, marketing, or liberal arts.

So what does this all mean for you? If you’re majoring in one of the following majors, or thinking about studying one of the following majors, here’s exactly how much extra money you can expect to have in your pocket after you sign that starting contract:

Accounting Salaries: Up.4 percent to $48,575
How to start an Accounting Career:
Accountants provide valuable services to individuals, independent businesses, and large corporations alike. An accounting degree will help teach you everything you need to know for this career, and prepare you to take the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) exam.

Computer Science Salaries: Up 4.7 percent to $60,426
How to Start a Computer Science Career:
If you spend any part of your day working on a computer, you know how invaluable computer science professionals are. As computers become more and more integral to our daily lives, the opportunities for this career path are endless.

Chemical Engineering Salaries: Up 1.6 percent to $66,437
How to Start a Chemical Engineering Career:
If you loved playing with your chemical set as a child, you might enjoy a career as a chemical engineer. These professionals combine physical sciences, such as chemistry, with life sciences and math to produce some of the most valuable materials and chemical processes of our time. To get started, you’ll need a Bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering. Visit our Bachelor’s degree programs page for information on Bachelor’s degree programs.

Civil Engineering Salaries: Up 1.3 percent to $52,443
How to Start a Civil Engineering Career:
Next time you drive over a bridge, pass under an underpass, or head to the airport, remember this: all of these structures are the work of civil engineers. A civil engineering degree will teach you how to study different environments and build structures that will survive the elements (and be completed on time and on budget).

Electrical Engineering Salaries: Up 3 percent to $59,326
How to Start an Electrical Engineering Career:
To become an electrical engineer, you’ll need to know how to build, test and develop the hottest new electronic items and devices. A Bachelor’s degree in engineering will get you on your way. Visit our Bachelor’s degree programs page for information on Bachelor’s degree programs.

Finance Salaries: Up 1.6 percent to $50,546
How to Start a Finance Career:
A finance degree can open the door to careers in financial analysis, financial auditing, and business. To find finance careers and degree programs, visit our financial analyst career profile.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off

How To Get A Finance Job From An Engineering Background

“It’s something very personal, a very important thing. Hell! It’s a family motto. Are you ready Jerry? I want to make sure you’re ready, brother. Here it is: Show me the money. SHOW! ME! THE! MONEY! Jerry, it is such a pleasure to say that! Say it with me one time, Jerry.”

-Rod Tidwell, “Jerry Maguire” (1996)

“If I’m an engineering major, how can I get into finance? Show me the money!”

I find myself answering this question a lot, possibly because I’m from a non-finance background myself. Or maybe just because everyone wants to get into finance.

How you can leverage your technical background to land a job in the jungle of finance? As a technical person right out of school, you have two ways of breaking in:

Get an investment banking analyst position in the technology or TMT (Technology, Media & Telecom) group of a bank. You will use none of your quantitative/analytical background and instead use your interest in the industry/work ethic to get in.
Get a quantitative job at a hedge fund or doing trading/fixed income at a bank. You will leverage your quantitative and probability skills to get in.
Of the two, the second is easiest for most engineers. Wall Street has never been more quantitative, and it’s only getting more quant-focused each day. Even with some recent problems in the credit market and some high-profile difficulties at prestigious funds such as Goldman Global Alpha, this trend will not stop anytime soon.

Hedge Fund And Related Jobs

On-campus recruiting for these positions is less common than it is for banking analysts, but it’s there if you seek it out. Citadel, one of the largest hedge funds in the world, does undergraduate recruiting for its rotational program, as does Jump Trading, based out of Chicago.

The good news is that if you’re an engineering major at a top university, you have a good chance of landing one of these jobs, even with no previous finance experience. If you’re in this position and go through on-campus recruiting, you need to emphasize your interest in finance because this is how they select candidates. Here’s a direct quote from a Citadel recruiter:

“To be honest, we know you’re all pretty good quantitatively… after all you got an engineering degree at one of the top programs in the country. You need to show us that you’re interested in finance because that’s what differentiates you.”

During interviews they will ask you quantitative questions but it’s crucial that you show them you have had a strong and consistent interest in finance. Have some good stories prepared, especially on personal investing and why you’re particularly well-suited to be a trader.

For trading jobs the “fit” part of the interview is even more important than it is for banking. If you don’t trade stocks in between classes and wake up early each morning to read financial news, gambling is a good hobby to mention. I was asked if I played video poker/online poker and other casino games when interviewing for hedge fund jobs. You want to emphasize hobbies/interests that show you can think about risk vs. reward.

No Thanks, I Really Want To Be A Banker

Full disclosure: you can do this, but the hours are going to be far worse than trading, the pay won’t be much better and you’ll have to do truly menial, low-value-add work. The advantage is you do have a wider variety of exit options – doing engineering and then banking sets you up very well for venture capital, for example. And the perks are nice.

As a technical person, you have several things going for you right away: no one will question your intelligence, and they probably won’t ask you brain teasers or math questions. If you can get a degree in Electrical Engineering, you can do Excel calculations in your sleep. And no one will question your attention to detail (or at least not as much as if you were an English major).

What you will need to focus on in recruiting and interviewing is demonstrating your 1) interest in finance and 2) ability to handle the hours/stress of the job, which are considerably worse than those of an engineering/tech company.

A few more specific tips: when you discuss your interest in finance you need to mention tech companies if you’re applying to a tech group in a bank. And don’t just mention Google or Facebook. These are the most visible tech companies by far, but anyone can learn about them by reading TechCrunch or by listening to friends.

You need to show real interest in the industry, which means taking the initiative and talking about less well-known companies. Before my interviews at tech groups in banks I made a list of less well-known startups/other companies I found interesting and had a story prepared around each of them. You should do the same.

As far as the second point about handling the stress/hours, as an engineering major you should have had many extended project classes… these are all good to mention, as are any internships where you launched a product that required “crunch time” at the end.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off

Can Engineers Opt For Finance Specialization in an MBA?

In almost all of the top business schools at present, you will find at least 25 % students are engineers. This is apparently somewhat astonishing. One might naturally question that why does an individual already trained in a particular discipline still want to be trained in something else? However, this trend clearly indicates a basic fact – if so many engineers are aiming for it, even at the cost of a couple of their valuable years, there must be some usefulness. So why are engineers increasingly going for an MBA degree? What specialization should they opt for when they are planning to do an MBA? In this blog we introspect a few such issues…

For the future of engineers in the modern competitive times, getting a post graduation degree is increasingly becoming important. There are certain specified matching sections for engineers in order to attain chartered status in their careers and one of them is management.

In addition, an engineer might start as a technical person at the beginning of his career, but it would be unjust to expect them to stay at the same capacity all through their career. In most cases they would aspire to rise to the top management level. And here lies the catch as to why engineers should also need an MBA degree. To rise above his initial level and become a manager, an engineer will also need to have some proven managerial skills. Getting an MBA degree will do exactly that and help him to progress faster in his career.

Moreover, if an engineer wants to start any entrepreneurial venture on his own, only his engineering training will not be sufficient. An MBA training will not only give him a more practical and analytical outlook towards every aspect of the organizational management, but will also make him street-smart and capable of handling any and every situation.

While doing an MBA and engineer can specialize in any stream be it marketing, finance, organizational behavior, operations, or human resource management. It is quiet understandable that an MBA degree in either organizational behavior, or operations, or human resource management might help him in managing his organization of which he is in charge of. Even if an engineer does MBA in marketing its is justified because when he starts off his own business, he needs to have marketing knowledge to sell his products. A specialization in finance too can be a great option. In fact there is a common misconception that only people with commerce background should go for an MBA in finance. However, contrary to popular perception even those that come with engineering background can also be the best when pursuing the specialization of finance in the tenure of their MBA course. Most financial consultancy companies and banks seems to prefer candidates who are MBA in finance and have an engineering background. This is probably because an MBA in finance makes one proficient in financial areas and the engineering training allows one to do logical and practical analysis of situations. A culmination of these two qualities definitely produces a finance manager with strong domain knowledge in finance and exemplary logical skills.

So if you are an engineer and planning to do an MBA you have made the right choice. Whatever be the specialization you choose, keep in mind that your engineering background coupled with the MBA degree will go a long way to establish yourself in your future career.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off